Tag Archives: independence

Mobility Update: My Guide Session 9

As promised, Jenny arrived at mine yesterday morning at our agreed time of 9:30 so that we could have our 9th My Guide session. although we usually stick to our once weekly session on a Thursday morning, this week that wouldn’t have been possible as I’m flying up to Newcastle to stay with Kieran and family for a fortnight from tonight onwards. kindly, Jenny offered to rearrange what would have otherwise been a missed session into happening two days earlier. that way, I only miss one session while I’m away.

I’m really grateful that Jenny did offer this as we had a great session – at least, we did after I got myself together! I almost left the house without my Trekker Breeze and once I’d quickly grabbed that, I almost walked away down the path without locking up the house… Safe to say those weren’t the brightest five minutes of my day! But once everything was done, we were on our way and things were going well. I remembered a lot of the first part of the route, getting from my house down onto the shore, a lot better than I have in previous weeks. I remembered where to turn, where to cross and mostly which direction I should be walking in. Once walking along the shore path, it becomes simple for quite a stretch: walk straight forward. Literally, that is all you have to do for quite a while. Next time I walk it, I’m going to time the part that is just a straight path. It makes up about 70% of the walk though. After the really long straight stretch, we then had Jenny’s least favourite part of the route: the little bit where on my left hand side there is about a two foot drop… Jenny worries that my cane might not find the edge before my feet do and to be fair it’s not totally impossible, especially with the angles I usually walk towards it. I’m not too fazed; I haven’t fallen off it and broken both my ankles yet. Although if I did slip off the edge, I’m sure that would be the painful result. After we’ve passed that little worrying patch, we’re onto crossing roads and actually getting into the shopping highstreet of Woolston. It doesn’t take a lot but there are a couple of busy crossings where I have to concentrate and be patient a lot. After that, it’s just the straight path of the highstreet and walking until I find the obstacle of Coffee Mac’s outdoor seating. It’s a good landmark, actually, to tell me I’ve reached our destination. On the way to that, though, today I walked into some scaffolding. There’s work being done to one of the shops near Coffee Mac’s so its unavoidable. Jenny had to guide me around it as one of the poles was diagonal and there was no way for my cane to find it before my face. A hazard of being a blind person I suppose. In Coffee Mac’s, because it was just so cold and because I felt things were going really well, I decided to branch out on my usual apple juice and accessorise it with a slice of banana loaf, my favourite type of cake. Plus, its got bananas in it, hasn’t it? Surely that makes it a little healthier! Right there I felt so cold that I didn’t care. I wanted cake so I was having cake. It was a good decision. The banana loaf was super tasty. They put nuts, I think walnut, in their recipe which adds a little extra flavour and texture to the cake. Usually, banana loaf is quite moist and a bit sloppy. The nuts added a bit of crunch and solidity to it. They were definitely a good addition to the banana loaf I’m used to. The slice was pretty generous, too, but I couldn’t help scoffing the lot. It was just so nice! I’m just a sucker for anything sweet.

The return journey went well. Jenny didn’t have to steer me around the scaffolding on the way back because my cane hit an upright pole so I was able to swerve out towards the curb to avoid it. The rest of the walk went well. I felt I mostly remembered turnings/crossings/the general direction well. There’s definitely improvement each week even if it is only gradual. Any is good. Route learning isn’t simple for me. I wish my brain could just remember a route after a couple of tries like some people I know. But it just doesn’t have the capability. A few years ago, I’d have said it was me being stubborn. I hated using my cane. Still do. But now I want to learn routes. I want to be able to get out and about to differing destinations so that I have a valid workload for a dog. Plus, its always better the more places you know to get to independently.

As we walked back towards Jenny’s least favourite part of the route, the ankle breaking drop, she had an idea to alter the route a little to make it safer. Instead of walking towards the drop. I go in a different direction and cross a road. This means I completely avoid the drop part altogether. One more crossing on a route where there are few doesn’t make much difference. The last section of the route went fine; the long straight stretch along the shore and then the few road crossings to my house. Most of the crossings and turnings at this point I remembered well too. When we reached my front gate, Jenny and I agreed to meet in two weeks from this Thursday once I’m home from Newcastle. I’m hopeful that although its in two weeks time, I’ll still remember most of the route quite well. We’ve been learning it a few weeks now so it shouldn’t all be lost on me. As of yet, I haven’t heard a whisper from Guide Dogs about the case review meeting. There’s of course the strong possibility that it hasn’t even happened yet. Hopefully, I’ll have heard something really soon. Things are going so well route learning that I’m hopeful the good news will continue from Guide Dogs too. But who knows? All I know is that I’m off to Newcastle for two weeks and don’t intend to think about routes for a second while I’m away.

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Mobility Update: My Guide Session 8

Since writing only 2 days ago, I’ve had some exciting news! As I said last time, Jenny contacted the leader of Southampton’s My Guide service to inquire whether the route we’re currently doing and the ones I plan to learn in the future would make me eligible for a guide dog. Ever since I very first applied for a guide dog all those years ago in 2011, their response has been that I don’t have enough routes and don’t go out enough independently to make up a workload for a dog. When I was a naive 14 year old, I thought this was ridiculous! I went to school every day, didn’t I? I could walk to the bus-stop and corner shop, too, if I wanted. And I’d even learnt how to get to my Nan and Grandad’s, then living in Woolston themselves, via a bus journey and some walking. Why on earth would they say I didn’t have enough routes or a big enough workload? I’d spent my whole six-week school summer holiday working with a mobility officer from Southampton’s sensory services, aided by a member of the Guide Dogs team. How could they say these things? In comparison, now I can see I was the ridiculous one. Yes, I did try really hard that summer and honestly, at the time, that was massive progress for me, a kid who didn’t leave the house unless I was attached to a parent. But it wasn’t nearly enough. I’m still yet to learn what is, but I’m much better prepared now, much closer to that target than I’ve ever been before. Anyway, the exciting news… so the leader of My Guide replied to Jenny’s request properly yesterday, to both of us. When a text message came through from her, I thought maybe it was just a little checkup on how Jenny and I are getting on. But she doesn’t need to check up. Jenny has given her full details on how we’re doing, my progress and my ambitions. She passed Jenny’s message onto several members of staff at Southampton’s Guide Dogs team, including the GDMI who assessed and crushed my world in October. They’ve agreed to take my case to the case review sometime next week to see if they can take my application for a guide dog forward. I couldn’t have hoped for anything anywhere near this good so soon into my work with the My Guide service. I predicted that perhaps I’d ask the leader of My Guide for some kind of review around my birthday or something. Not get one 8 weeks after I started working with Jenny. The case review meeting will take place sometime next week according to the leader of My Guide’s text. That’s really exciting! There could be plenty of outcomes of the review, but the main two options I think are either they’ll say I’m doing well but not yet far enough for them to be able to reconsider my application for a dog, or, they’ll say yes, I’ve done really well and they can reconsider my application now. If they reconsider my application and plan to move it forward, I’m guessing that means that they’ll consider putting me on the waiting list for a dog. But I could be wrong. Both my guide dog know-alls, Imi and Tiny, have both seemed quite positive about the text messages and the possible outcomes I could get. Imi, in fact, said she hopes I’m being positive now. I am. As soon as the My Guide leader text, i was imagining having a Guide Dog, being put on the list, having the yes answer… but perhaps I’ve got it all wrong. I guess I’ll find out next week.

As for today, Jenny had our 8th My Guide session, doing the new route for the third time, the second time me trying to learn it. I felt, considering everything, that it went really well. I feel like I’m picking it up really well to say its only the second proper time I’ve walked it myself. Jenny and I agreed that she’d have as little input as possible, just let me get on with it and only telling me if I’d gone the wrong way. Mostly I did well. Jenny only had to correct me a couple of times. It took about an hour to get there. As always, we stopped off in Coffee Mac’s for our little break, me having my apple juice and Jenny her coffee. She’s started asking me to see if I can locate a table once we’re in the shop and its quite easy to find the one we always sit at. As long as every time I go in there its free ‘ll be ok… we popped into see Dad quickly afterward. That entails me crossing the road and walking along to Dad’s shop. He was ok and we didn’t stay long.

The return journey went just as well, with Jenny correcting me whenever necessary. It felt longer walking on the way home but according to Jenny’s watch it was actually shorter. I know I felt more tired when I reached my front door than I did on arriving at Coffee Mac’s. it shows just how lucky I am to have been matched with such a good volunteer that Jenny offered to meet me next Tuesday to do our ninth session. I’m flying up to Kieran’s next Wednesday so will be away for our usual Thursday session. I really didn’t expect Jenny to say she could meet me on an alternative day but feel really grateful that she is. Hopefully, we can continue the good run we’re on with learning this route. Also, hopefully next week I’ll have news from Guide Dogs. But whatever the outcome, I’m just going to carry on. Of course, if they do say i haven’t done enough yet and need to carry on learning, I’ll be a bit disappointed that it isn’t a straight away yes answer. But my plan was to learn routes until at least May so if they ask me to carry on I haven’t lost anything. If its a yes answer, I’m so much more lucky than I thought I was. Maybe by the next time I write my next My Guide update, I’ll have the outcome.

Mobility Update My Guide Session 7

Last week’s session was a positive one. After changing the route, I’d been really concerned that as it seemed a lot shorter and less complicated than the one we tried first, Guide Dogs might not be happy with it. However, it is so much simpler so a lot easier to learn. I haven’t got it anywhere near fully remembered yet, but this week was really our first session of learning it so that isn’t a concern. Last week, we just tested out the route, walking the way Jenny guessed would work. But we tried out a few different things, meaning that we hadn’t actually done the full route properly. But on thursday we did. With my Trekker Breeze on and recording, we headed out on the new route.

As I’d thought last week, it is so much simpler than the first route into Woolston we tried. Jenny counted an approximate 25 crossings in total for that route and there’s only got to be 5 or so in this new route. That’s not me saying I want to take the easy way out, because I don’t, but it just seems daft to persevere with a route I was struggling so much with when there’s an easier option that will get me to the same destination with less hassle. Plus, the walk along Weston shore is lovely; it’ll be really beautiful in the sunny summer, if we get one. It is pretty much one straight path all the way to Woolston. I don’t even have to swap to the opposite side of the road or anything like that. But it still takes about an hour each way, which of course is still a fair walking distance and good exercise for me. Yes, the other route was more challenging and gave me more to think about, but the simplicity of this one isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

Again, we stopped for our usual break in Coffee Mac’s, feeling quite pleased with how the route was going so far. Because of that optimism, I decided to have a little extra in the shape of a cheese and bacon panini to go with my apple juice. I kind of got fed up of hot chocolate – I’ve never been the biggest fan, only liking it occasionally – and the apple juice is healthier. But I was hungry and things were going well so I felt a snack was deserved. Jenny clearly agreed because she went for a toasted tea cake to go with her coffee. Sadly, I was disappointed with my panini. There was just something about it that tasted funny. I think next time we have a great session I’ll stick to my reward of a slice of cake. Jenny said she enjoyed her tea cake, though, so that was good.

The return journey was good, too. There a couple of tricky patches along the route but there nothing in comparison to the difficulties in the other route to Woolston. I’m certain they’ll be easily ironed out after a few weeks’ practice of this route. Another thing that reassured me that this route is a good choice was by my friend Jemma. She lives in southampton also, actually in the same area as me, and has a gorgeous German SHepherd Guide Dog. It just so happened that as we were walking towards home, they were waiting to catch a bus at the bus-stop nearer to there place that I pass on my way home. We stopped so that I could say hello and I told Jemma that I was in the process of learning the route into Woolston. She asked which way we go and we explained. It turns out that the new route is the route Jemma uses if shes walking into Woolston. This gave me huge reassurance because if she uses that route with her Guide Dog then Guide Dogs can’t object to me sticking with it.

Jenny has passed on my concerns about this route to the leader of My Guide, who replied and said she’d forward these onto the GDMI to find out whether the route would be good enough and also if I’m doing enough. Hopefully, they’ll get back to Jenny soon and we’ll have an answer. I’m hoping it’ll be a positive one after all the hard work I’m putting into learning these routes. Sadly, Dad and I couldn’t go out on our walk last Wednesday to continue learning the route to my sister’s school because the weather was just too bad. To begin with, we’d thought it could be ok, but then the wind really picked up and there was just no point in trying. I’m just really hoping that the weather holds off tomorrow so that we can get out. It’s not an over complicated route, either, but its still going to take me a few tries to learn it so the more times were able to get out there practising it the better. Plus, I’m flying up to visit Kieran and family next Wednesday evening for a fortnight so I’m going to miss at least one My Guide opportunity and definitely two walks with Dad. It isn’t a big deal, really, because I feel like I’m making leaps and bounds in progress but I’m impatient so for me any sessions missed I’ll want to make up for, the more sessions I miss, the longer it’ll take in the long run for me to learn these routes and therefore be accepted fo a dog. Obviously, visiting Kieran is important to. He’s my other half, my fella, and we don’t get that much time together considering the almost 300 miles separating Weston from Blyth. So I’ll take any opportunity i can to see him, even if that does mean sacrificing precious route learning time. Ive waited this long for a Guide Dog, I’m sure a couple extra weeks in the long term shouldn’t make a massive difference. As long as I get there after all this effort, that’s all that really matters. As the new Woolston route and the route to my sister’s school are both going well, I don’t think I’ve got too much to worry about. Plus, next week I have my employment support session and the lady is just going to follow me to the library this time. Then, as long as shes happy that I’m familiar enough with the route, next time I’ll do it by myself and meet her there. The library route isn’t much in comparison to the Woolston route, but doing it completely independently for a purpose is definitely a step in the right direction.

So everything is going smoothly and I’m making progress in all areas of mobility. Plus, people have been contacted to make sure that this time it’ll be a positive response after all my hard work. I couldn’t have hoped for things to be going any better. Hopefully, tomorrow Dad and I will make more progress with the route to my sister’s school and on Thursday Jenny and I will continue the process of learning the new Woolston route. Fingers crossed I have more positivity to report on next time…

Mobility Update: My Guide Session 6

Yesterday’s My Guide session was different to say the least. At first, Jenny and I were a bit dubious about how it would go as the ground was quite frosty and Jenny was worried it’d be too slippery underfoot. Thankfully, it wasn’t and we were able to continue with the session as normal. Except, it wasn’t a normal session. We changed the whole arrangement of things from what we have been doing to something SO MUCH BETTER!

If you’re up-to-date with my My Guide session post – which, if you aren’t, I don’t blame you, I just waffle on and this is more for my entertainment and satisfaction than anything else! – then you’ll know that since Jenny and I started working together we’ve been working on a route from my home into Woolston, the nearest little shopping street. Well the route Jenny picked out, we tested and I agreed on was quite complicated to say the least. Ive never been good at learning routes; I don’t know why, its just not one of my strong points. So this new complex route was definitely a challenge. A month into walking it by myself and we both felt I was making progress considering how much there was to learn and remember. But today Jenny suggested something else, something I wish we’d thought of before I stressed over the complicated route. There’s a much more straightforward and easy route into Woolston. Instead of approximately 25 crossings (Jenny counted), this is one straight road that leads into Woolston. It takes about an hour each way, we’re going to time it next week to get a definite time frame, and is so straightforward I’m hopeful I could have it memorised fairly soon. After last week’s horrible session, this was such a relief. Maybe its me taking the easy way out. But it shouldn’t matter. It’s still a lengthy route, although less complicated, and still leads me to the intended destination. Also, it means I get to walk for longer beside the shore, which will be glorious in summer. Jenny also spotted that there’s a stretch of green that could make a great short free run spot parallel to the route I’m walking.

It worried me a little, though. As its so simple, it takes less time to get to Woolston. Jenny suggested that some of this was probably due to the amount of time I spent judging if roads were safe to cross on the other route; its complexities made it naturally longer. I decided that I’d check the results of my Fitbit, which tracks steps, floors climbed, distance walked and active minutes, that night against previous weeks’ totals for our sessions. The results were quite different. Where usually its at least 14000 steps and well over 4 miles, nearly 6 sometimes, those results showed just over 12000 steps and less than 4 miles. I don’t know if its just because the route is less complicated; it must be because technically I’m still going from the same starting point to the same destination. I’m just concerned this could be a problem. Should I be focusing on the more complicated route because it presents a challenge and is definitely longer? Or is the fact that the other route is easier and more of a convenience, sadly making it shorter, more worthwhile to pursue? I talked this over with Jenny while we sat in Coffee Mac’s again, she with her coffee and me my apple juice. She tried to reassure me that, even if it was a bit shorter, the principle of the route was the walking thing and as I had the outward and return route it still took quite a long time so would provide a lengthy working time for any future guide dog. Looking at my Fitbit results, though, it looks as if the easier route cuts out quite a lot of mileage. I just can’t work out if that’s a bad thing or whether it shouldn’t be a problem. If someone who knows about these things could shed some light for me, I’d be greatly appreciated.

It was a lovely route though, especially as the weather was quite nice. On the return journey it did get a bit windy but mostly it was nice. Before we headed home, Jenny and i popped across the road to say hello to Dad in his carpet shop. I’d told Jenny all about the progress Dad and I had been making with our Wednesday walks and she seemed pleased. While we’d been sat in the coffee shop, she had written down a list of all my known and potential routes. It’s becoming quite a list. For known routes we currently have:

Short routes:

1. Walk to local bus-stop, barely 3 minutes;

2. 2. Walk to nearby Co-op, about 10 minutes each way.

3. 3. Bus route to Woolston. Although of course this doesn’t involve much walking, only onto the bus from home (shown above) and off the other end to wherever I want to go e.g. coffee shop, Co-op or see Dad, I consider it as a route as before now I wouldn’t be considering things like that.

4. 4. Bus route into town centre/shops: again, dozens involve much walking but opens up lots of opportunities e.g. meeting a friend, going to a coffee shop, getting myself lunch;

5. 5. Route from home to library = about 25 minutes each way, I’ll time it properly when I do it next week;

6. 6. Home to Mayfield Park = about 25-ish minutes each way with a free run in the middle;

7. 7. Route from home to the gym/leisure centre = about 30 minutes each way, I’ll time it properly when I go next;

8. 8. Route from home to news agents = about 35 minutes each way. I’ll time it properly when Dad and I do our next walk;

9. Routes I’m learning:

10. 1. Route from home to sister’s school = about 45-50 minutes each way. Dad and I will time it properly next time we do our walk as last week was the first time.

11. 2. Route from home to Woolston (now changed to newer less complicated route) = 55 minutes to an hour each way. We only did a test run of this yesterday so wil record it to my Trekker Breeze and time it properly after that.

12. 3. Home to Nan’s = no idea how long, Dad estimates at least an hour each way. We’re going to learn this after we’ve learnt the school.

13. 4. Home to Victoria Country Park = no idea how long. Jenny suggested it yesterday and as it was Zena’s favourite free run spot and would create another probably long route I thought why not.

14. 5. Home to archery’s park = I’m not sure. We’ve started to learn it via the long and complicate route we were using but Jenny says there are several different ways to get there. There’s a possibility of eventually learning them all for variation.

15. 6. Home to Dominoes Pizza/Co-op = probably as long as the library route as they’re an extension of it, although I’m considering learning how to get there using part of the complicated route we were using.

16. 7. Home to train station to airport = no idea. It would be mostly transport but I think it’d be a handy one to have under my belt. I’d have to get my usual bus from home into Woolston, then another bus from Woolston to opposite outside southampton central statin. Then get inside the station, find a member of staff and be put on the train to southampton airport parkway station. From there, disembark and get assistance to take me the exit. Then learn from the exit, along the road and across into airport arrivals hall. This idea was planted by John nearly a year ago when I was training with Zena. Although it sounds complicated with all those steps it should actually be quite straightforward.

So there’s quite a lot to be getting on with. I’m sure I’ve probably forgotten some in that list. We discussed loads esterday and I wish I had an in-built notebook to record all thoughts. Jenny was taking notes in a book herself so if I’ve forgotten anything she’ll have it written down. I’m still going with the idea that I’ll inform Guide Dogs once I’ve learnt the route to Woolston and ask to be put on the waiting list for a dog and in the meantime, while I’m waiting, continue to work through that list of routes with Jenny that we’ve compiled. I feel that’s a reasonable request, especially considering how long the waiting list can be and my insistence that Jenny and I will continue working on more routes. By the time I hopefully get matched with a guide dog, I should have so many routes we’ll be too busy! I should at least have a much wider choice than I did with Zena. Really, I already do. And if that isn’t seen as progress and dedication, I don’t know what could be.

So next Thursday Jenny and I have our seventh session. We’re going to be working on the new and improved route into Woolston. As it is so simple, I’m feeling very optimistic about it. I just hope its simplicity won’t reflect badly on me. I still intend to use fractions of that old route, just not the whole thing to get to Woolston. In time, with learning fractions of it for other destinations I might even crack the whole thing into Woolston. It would be a good walking alternative to get there in the winter because our new and improved one would be quite chilly in the winter where its mostly open spaces. I’m really thrilled with these massive leaps we’ve suddenly made today. Its like one of those breakthrough moments and it couldn’t have come at a better time after last week’s disaster. But as Jenny said, its all learning and I will still be using parts of that complicated route so nothing was wasted. Hopefully next week will be even more positive…

Mobility Update: My Guide Session 5

My fifth My Guide session took place last Thursday. As always, Jenny and I set out on the route optimistically because things had gone so well previously. But this session was different. I don’t know if I wasn’t in the right mindset or if other things were on my mind too much but things just felt different. And they went from bad to worse with cars parking on pavements, my cane getting caught in bushes/behind poles and posts. I even misjudged a couple of crossings and slipped off the curb. I quickly corrected myself but that wasn’t the point; I don’t do these things. Even though I’m still having mobility sessions, they’re primarily so I can learn routes. By almost everyone who has ever assessed my mobility, I’ve always been complimented on having good long cane skills. It was always the lack of wanting to use them that was frowned upon. So these little niggles annoyed me. They’re nothing massive and its no big deal in the grand scheme really but its irritating to be making these mistakes when I feel so close to achieving what I’ve been working towards for so long.

The outbound walk was the worst. My cane just got caught behind and on so much. It was frustrating beyond belief. Add to that the cars parked on pavements and it made the whole thing pretty unpleasant. I admire Jenny’s patience and calmness. I’d have got fed up with me if I was someone trying to help. I was fed up of me being me! The cars parked on the pavements weren’t major ones. They didn’t block the whole path, they just made an inconvenience along my journey I could have done without. If there’s an obstacle on the pavement, be it bin, parked car or uncovered man hole or whatever it is, it makes you have to slow down and reassess everything. You have to work out which angles to carry on, whether the gap is actually safe enough for you to pass through and then how to manoeuvre yourself through the situation. Usually, there’s more than enough room but if not, you’ve then got to work out if its safe for you to venture out into the road, carefully skirt closely around the car and then get back onto the path. And if this is a main road then this can become horrendous and extremely dangerous. Thankfully, there was none of the worst case scenario situations for me on Thursday. That would have really topped off my bad mood nicely.

By the time we reached our little coffee shop in Woolston, I was thoroughly frustrated with the whole event. I just wanted to be indoors somewhere not having to think about routes or possibilities or progress. Because it felt like, even though I’d remembered a lot of the crossings, landmarks and turnings on the route correctly, we’d actually taken two steps backward in terms of progress. In hindsight, perhaps that feeling was over-exaggerated at the time. I feel better about the whole thing now we’re nearly a week on from it than I did at the time. It made me question everything, especially when the fact that Guide Dogs still hold all the power of my dream came to mind. Although I’m putting all this effort in and wholeheartedly intend to continue to do so, when I approach Guide Dogs again and tell them I feel I’m ready to continue with my application, that I’d like to be reconsidered as now ready and enough for one of their dogs they could so easily say no, I’m not ready yet, I still don’t have enough routes, the workload isn’t big enough, am I sure this is what I want? It’s crushing. The thought that I could make all this massive progress – because, for me, it really is huge in comparison to what I’m used to – and they could still say no… Most of the time I really have to put that thought out of my mind otherwise it gets me really down. The idea that it could be years until I get accepted for a dog hurts and makes all this seem pointless.

Jenny tried to boost my spirits by saying how good things were looking with the route. I just wasn’t feeling it. It was nice to still have someone else having faith in me, though, and the feeling that even if it felt rubbish to me, it still looked like progress to Jenny was good news. This is all thought of in hindsight, mind. By the time I reached the sanctuary of my bedroom on Thursday afternoon, I was wholeheartedly deflated and down about the whole situation. The return trip was better. Although, not long into it the wired Aftershokz headphones I have to use with my Trekker Breeze died completely. I never carry the extra external little clip on speaker with me because the headphones never fully lose charge. So I was caught out. I tried clipping the Breeze’s belt clip onto the collar of my coat and positioning the in-built speaker next to my ear. But it just made everything clumsy and awkward and I couldn’t hear the announcements the Breeze was speaking even then. Reluctantly admitting defeat, I switched it off and put it in my pocket, cursing myself for not charging the headphones. Unfortunately, with them there’s no way of knowing when their battery is low so its always risky taking them out. But their battery lasts such a long time that I always forget it must need charging at some point. Strangely, from then onward the route seemed to go quite well. I remembered crossings, landmarks and turnings well and Jenny seemed quite impressed, drawing on how I must be retaining most of the route well now as I wasn’t asking her for too many hints and the Breeze was unavailable to give me reminders. It felt quite good doing some of the route without my Breeze. But I wouldn’t want to be out often without it. The reassurance it gives is so comforting and having it there as backup should anything disastrous happen is such a support. Maybe I should be able to do it without the Breeze. But I don’t see why having that extra safety net should be an issue. I always make sure the Breeze has enough charge and only on stupid occasions like this do things like the headphones battery dying happen. The GPS signal is always clear enough for the Breeze to get an accurate enough reading and that’s enough for me. I don’t rely on it. I intend to have this route fully memorised before I even consider approaching Guide Dogs again. But having it as support and guidance if I need it is nice and I wouldn’t give that up for anything. I wish I’d discovered Trekker Breeze sooner. Maybe then I’d have been further in this journey than I am currently. Maybe it’d have given me the confidence to learn routes and get out of the house years ago like I should have. Who knows? It didn’t happen.

Now looking back on the day in hindsight I can see it wasn’t as bad as I felt at the time. It is pretty disheartening though when things go wrong. Coincidentally, the night before it happened, I was talking to my ex cricket captain and constant adviser Tiny about my plans of making progress with this whole thing and he mentioned that I shouldn’t get too down if a bad session came along. I’m so glad he said that before it happened because it helped me get the resolve of “oh well, next session will be better and this isn’t the end of everything”. On Thursday night, I messaged Tiny, and Imi too, voicing my fears about Guide Dogs still saying no even after I put all this effort in and the feeling of knowing it might all be nothing despite my progress. Tiny’s response was the best. Although I struggled to agree with him on Thursday night I understand what he meant. He said that basically I needed to see the smaller goals and achievements in the whole thing as well as aiming toward my end goal of a guide dog. He had a point even if I couldn’t see it at the time through my disappointment at the way the day had gone. It made me think though. If I hadn’t been out learning a new route, what would I have been doing? Sat at home at my desk studying, most likely, just how I do every weekday. I wouldn’t have been in the company of a nice person, inhaling all the fresh air, being outside or having a drink in a nice little coffee shop with friendly staff. Those are the small blessings in this situation. But on Thursday it was hard to see how those things mattered in the grand scheme of things. And that point is still valid. The only reason I’m doing all this is so that Guide Dogs finally accept me as adequate and eligible for one of their dogs. It’s so I can have the independence I got a glimpse of when I had zena and none of the other positives matter. In the long run, if Guide Dogs were to decline my application again, I wouldn’t be looking back thinking “wow how lucky was I to be spending all that time outside learning a new really long route”. I’d be thinking “what a waste of time!”. I’ll forever be grateful that Jenny agreed to be my volunteer, that shes spending so much of her own personal time each week helping me towards my goal. But if that goal is never achieved, I won’t be glad I spent all this time trying to reach it. I’ll be gutted. Mainly because I spent so much time working so damn hard doing what they told me I needed to do for it then to be said not to be enough. How they could do that, I don’t know. But anything is possible and the fact I’ve not had a yes yet makes me cynical. Hopefully that cynicism will be wiped away after all this hard work and they’ll say yes straight away, acknowledging the effort I’ve put in which clearly shows how much I want a dog, how dedicated I will be to the partnership if only they give me a chance. I was dedicated to Zena. I was, just not many other people seem to see that. I tried 1000% my best with her. The whole thing just fell apart. The fact shes now living as a pet is testament to the fact I definitely made the right decision for both of us. She was miserable, I wasn’t safe in her care and eventually we’re both going to have our rightful places, she as a pet and I with a new dog who loves guiding and keeps me safe always. I just have to be positive, I guess. That’s always been one of my big problems. Always too miserable and cynical. Why shouldn’t Guide Dogs accept me onto the waiting list after this long route is accomplished? I’ll have done everything they asked of me. That’s how I need to think. A quiet confidence that this time, after all this work, it’ll all pay off.

Jenny and I have another session on Friday. I’m glad I waited until today to write this so I was in a better frame of mind to put things into words. It would have been a very angry post if I’d written it on Thursday afternoon like I’d planned. Luckily, other things have been going well. Last Wednesday, Dad and I walked the route up to the news agents he’s been teaching me. I didn’t need any prompting or guidance. So that route is done. On the way back, we walked via Mayfield Park, the spot I’d predicted would be great for a free run. I wasn’t wrong. It was perfect. I think, once the dog and I had a solid partnership, I’d even be able to take it for a run by myself. The park is enclosed and I’d be able to walk in a straight line along the perimeter of the park while the dog was off lead and get to the exit safely. Ive tried it with dad. So I’m really happy with that route and its been completed a lot quicker than I expected. In addition to that, today Dad and I tried a new route. It was to my sister’s secondary school. We’ve already tried one way, that takes you up and over a train bridge. But, although this way was longer, it was so much easier. It’s an extension of the gym/news agents route, which is great, and the new additional part isn’t complicated at all. After a few tries, I’m positive I’ll have it figured out and memorised. It means that, if I wanted to, I could meet my sister from school. More than that, its another at least 45 minute each way route that I know. This one even has a decent destination. Its a win win all round. While doing that route, I realised, as an extension of that, I’d be able to learn how to walk from my house to my grandparents’ house. I was planning to learn the bus route there with Jenny after we’ve finished the Woolston route but Dad says he can show me the route on foot. If I can memorise that, I think I’d learn the bus route as a backup. More and more possibilities of routes seem to be opening up and its such a nice feeling, especially as the more routes i have the happier Guide Dogs should be about my eligibility and commitment for a dog. It’ll all take time, I know, but progress is more than steady even with the blips in my fifth My Guide session. There’s the chance that my sixth could be the best yet. I guess I’ll find out Friday. For now, though, I’m going to stay positive. After the progress I have been making with the Woolston route and the leaps and bounds Dad and I are making with our routes, I can’t be disappointed. In fact, things are going better than I hoped. Fingers crossed everything stays positive.

PS: I’ve fixed the glove issue. Ive discovered that I can wear the fingerless gloves I have with the flap pulled over making them into mittens and its still almost as safe using my cane. I don’t lose much sensitivity at all and, best of all, my hands keep toasty. See, silver lining in every rain cloud…

Mobility Update: My Guide Session 4

Our My Guide session today was probably the best we’ve had so far. This morning, I had been a bit worried that Jenny might call and say the weather was looking too bad and we needed to postpone or rearrange. However, at 9:30 when I was in my Hivis coat and my Trekker Breeze was all set up, Jenny arrived at my door. She said that actually the weather was looking quite promising, with no rain forecast whatsoever and only increasing winds later on. It was breezy but nothing to strong. Actually, it was quite a comfortable morning to be out route learning. I came back this afternoon with a buzz I hadn’t felt before.

The outward route was definitely better than it has been so far. I seemed to be remembering so much more of the route and Jenny didn’t seem to be prompting me as much. Also, we decided to let me gauge when it was safe to cross roads. Before now, Jenny has been telling me when its safe to cross so I can concentrate on learning the route. But shes letting me have more control over the route and that’s nice; but I think this point in my learning of the route is the right time for me to start paying attention to other factors than just which direction Im going in. I thought I was quite good at judging when it was safe to cross, if a little impatient. Jenny kept advising that I wait for cars to pass or get closer before deciding to cross. She didn’t let me cross unless she thought it was safe, though, so I wasn’t in any danger.

On reaching Woolston, the sun started to shine. I was feeling really positive about how the route had gone so far. Jenny told me that things looked to be going well. I’m surprised how far I’ve come already. I feel like I’m picking things up quite quickly and didn’t think things would progress this fast. I’m nowhere near completing the route or knowing it by heart but more and more of it is adding up in my head. We stopped in Coffee Mack for a drink again. I was tempted to have a slice of cake but am saving it for a more momentous occasion in the route’s progress. However, I did have a luxury hot chocolate with marshmallows again. I’m glad I’m walking so much on this route otherwise the calories from the hot chocolate so often would be impacting upon my waistline! But I feel it’s a nice treat for my progress with the routes. Also, its nice for Jenny and I to have a sit down midway through the route to cool off a bit. Plus, I feel it takes up quite a lot of my concentration and brain power to learn routes and this is the most complex route I’ve ever learnt. But its so rewarding to learn it. Imagining how I’ll use it in the future is so nice, especially as the route is slowly coming together in my head. And of course I’m lucky to have been matched with such a nice volunteer as Jenny.

This week, the return journey was just as good as the outward rather than better, which was nice. It went really well. I chose good points to cross, mostly, and didn’t need pointers constantly. But when we got back to Weston Shore, there was flooding across the road and pavement, meaning we couldn’t continue with the route. Also, as the forecast had predicted, the wind had picked up considerably. As we had to go off route to get back to my house, Jenny guided me. As we walked, the wind became quite fierce, buffeting us about. Thankfully, Jenny got us back to my house safely. We agreed to meet the same time next week to continue with this route. On our way back, I suggested to Jenny that maybe next week we could take a detour off the route in to the Archery’s park, which was a separate destination to learn how to get to. The park was a place I used to go to regularly when I was little to play in but I know it’d make a great place with a free run. Coincidentally, it turns out the park is on route to Woolston so I’m learning two routes in one really. But so far I’ve concentrated on learning the route into Woolston instead of exploring the inside of the park’s perimeter. Jenny agreed, as long as it hasn’t been raining otherwise the park would be extremely muddy.

I couldn’t be happier with how my learning with a My Guide volunteer is going. I never thought it would be this positive and have to thank everyone who encouraged me to take this opportunity. A little bit of me wishes I’d stuck with it last January when I was matched with a volunteer because maybe by now I’d be on the Guide Dogs waiting list or even have a guide dog. But everything happens for a reason. If I’d pursued with My Guide then then I wouldn’t be matched with Jenny or have had Zena in my life. Things might not have progressed so well learning routes last year as they have now. I’m even more determined to get a dog now than I ever have been before and I think that’s helping fuel my desire to learn these routes perfectly. Because I definitely wouldn’t do it otherwise, with no disrespect to Jenny. But its certainly nice being so motivated to do something, and something that’s going to benefit me so much in the long term. Hopefully, next Thursday will further the progress I felt I made. Maybe, as Jenny joked today, we’ll even have good weather and blazing sunshine for our session. At least the first option may happen…

Mobility Update: My Guide Session 3

My latest My Guide session took place just before Christmas on the 21st of December. That date was also my assignment deadline date for one of my Open University modules. This meant that I was under quite a bit of pressure to get everything done in time for Christmas. Luckily, I managed to get further ahead quicker than I’d expected to and so by the time Jenny knocked on my front door at 9:30 on Thursday my assignment was complete and submitted. This meant that I could put my full concentration into learning the new route.

It was a much nicer morning outside this time. There was barely any wind and the temperature was extremely mild for late December. This meant that as we walked along the shore I could hear Jenny perfectly. I remembered a little bit more of the forward route than I had the previous week. My Trekker was incredibly helpful with its audio landmarks and guidance. It isn’t 100% accurate, but then what GPS device is? For technology that’s several years ago, I think its accuracy is pretty decent. I’m still waiting to hear from HumanWare on my Victor Reader Trek but now we’re in the new year and they said to expect to hear from them in the new year so hopefully it’ll be any time now.

We had coffee in the little coffee shop we’d stopped in last week. Again their luxury hot chocolate was lovely. The man who runs it knows my dad and recognised me as his daughter. He provided us with great service and Jenny told me about the food they have on offer which includes jacket potatoes, paninis and slices of all different kinds of cake. The fact that they sell banana loaf caught my attention. It is my ultimate favourite cake and I think that I’ll treat myself to a piece when I’ve accomplished a bit more of the route. I think I’ll have banana loaf as a treat when I’ve retained more of the route in my head.

Again, the return route was even better than anything I’ve managed so far. I remembered more landmarks and which direction to go in. We re-recorded a few of the landmarks on my Trekker to try and make the route a bit more accurate next time. It felt good to be retaining more information about the route. While we walked, Jenny took notes of the route in a notebook; she recorded which directions I needed to turn at certain points along the route and particular landmarks to look out for that signal particular parts in the route. She agreed to email them across to me and I plan to spend some time reading over and over them so I can maybe remember some of them while walking the route. The hope is that they might help me learn it.

By the time I reached my front gate, I was feeling quite positive about the route and the gradual progress I seem to be making. My biggest worry, however, is that I will have forgotten the small amount of information I’ve retained so far over the gap of the Christmas period. My only hope is that my brain will be better than I’m expecting and remember more while I’m walking the route again. My next session is scheduled for Thursday at 9:30. The weather forecast predicts the weather is going to be quite horrible so I’m just hoping its not so bad that we have to reschedule. The more sessions I have, the quicker I can remember this route and add it to my list of routes I know. I can only hope that Thursday’s session goes well and that I make more progress. If not and I’ve forgotten some parts, I hope Thursday’s session gives me an opportunity to get back to the stage I was at before Christmas.

Mobility Update: My Guide Session 2

After the success of my first My Guide session, I was feeling positive about my second meeting with Jenny. At 9:30am on Thursday she arrived at my door ready to set out on our long walk into Woolston. I had my Trekker Breeze and wired Aftershokz in place ready so we headed out. It was chilly but not raining and not as windy as the week before. This week, I’d decided to try the route with my cane with Jenny following and instructing whenever necessary.

As I’d anticipated, I didn’t remember much of the route from last week. Then, Jenny had guided me and I’d been concentrating on recording all the necessary landmarks into my Trekker Breeze. But Jenny didn’t seem to mind at all.

We took the outward route at quite a slow pace so that hopefully I’d start absorbing some information about the route. My Trekker Breeze did quite well at alerting me when we needed to cross roads. But Jenny and I did notice that it missed a few of the landmarks we’d recorded last time. To fix this, we recorded more landmarks whenever it seemed necessary.

The coldest and most difficult part of the route was walking along the shore. It was quite hard for me to hear Jenny talking or my Trekker’s prompts. Thankfully, as soon as we turned away from the shore, the wind lessened.

On the way, I didn’t feel like I was retaining much of the route. Hardly anything was coming back to me from the week before. My hands were absolutely freezing holding my cane and there were times when I considered stopping and letting Jenny guide me, just until I could bend my fingers properly again. But I kept going. There were little bits and pieces that came back to me from the week before as we walked, landmarks that jogged my memory or little sections of pavement that reminded me where I was.

But I was thrilled when we got onto the Main Street of Woolston. Jenny and I agreed to go for a coffee to warm up and Jenny took me into a little coffee shop she recommended. Even though I go to Woolston often, I didn’t even realise it existed. Jenny had a coffee and I had a luxury hot chocolate with marshmallows but without the cream. It was lovely, but huge, and I burnt my tongue. Jenny said her coffee was nice too. I though the prices were quite reasonable too; my luxury hot chocolate was £2.30 and it was a good size. I told Jenny how I thought this shop would be quite handy on cold winter days if I walked into Woolston. I told her how I could imagine walking down into Woolston with my furry pal and popping into the coffee shop to have a hot chocolate and thaw out from the icy weather. There was plenty of space ideal for a Guide Dog under the table we sat at too.

When we were finished, we headed back out to do the reverse route. This time, I felt it went much better. I felt I remembered quite a bit more than the outward journey and Jenny seemed quite pleased too. It was still chilly though. Not as freezing as it had been but chilly.the walk along the shore was blustery again and I found it difficult to hear Jenny and my Trekker Breeze. Although we recorded the whole route and then the reverse route, the Trekker didn’t follow all of the route correctly. I don’t know if it thought we’d gone a different way or if there was an easier way to go according to its maps but there were parts when it told me to turn around and that I’d gone off route. Jenny assured me we were going the same and right way.

I was pleased to reach my front gate simply because my hand felt like it had frozen in place on my cane. Ive never used a cane for that length of time solidly before. It felt like a good accomplishment, though, and definitely a step in the right direction. Jenny seemed please with how the session had gone and definitely the route on the way back. I was pleased that I’d retained even some of the route. I hadn’t expected even that.

Jenny and I agreed to meet for our third session the following Thursday at the same time of 9:30am. I’m hoping that my third session and second session doing the route with my cane will be even more positive than the first was. I’m hopeful that I’ll have retained even more of the route and that the new landmarks we programmed into the Trekker will be more accurate and useful. Maybe Jenny and I can even have another hot drink in the nice little coffee shop. Anyway, its all very positive currently and I’m more than happy with how things are going. Although there hasn’t been much so far, I’m happy with the little progress I have made.

Mobility update: the outcome of my Guide Dog assessment

Since i last wrote a mobility update, quite a lot has happened. Last time I wrote, I’d had my mobility assessment with the instructor from Guide Dogs and she’d told me she felt I was more than ready for the next part of the assessment, where a GDMI [Guide Dogs Mobility Instructor] would come to my house and talk everything dog related. She advised I’d probably have to do a short handle walk, a walk where I hold the harness and the instructor walks as if they’d dog, and I command as if they are the dog. I felt a bit nervous about this as, 6 years ago when I had my first guide dogs assessment, that was one of the things they picked up on: that I wasn’t particularly vocal with the dog. At the time I was 14 and terrified; I was desperate for a guide dog for all the wrong reasons and absolutely heartbroken and gutted when, predictably, they told me I wasn’t ready yet. But I felt confident after this assessment; the woman had been more positive than I could have hoped she’d be. She said my mobility had come on leaps and bounds since she assessed me a year ago and that I’d finally done what she needed.

Unfortunately, at the next assessment, in mid October, things were very different. The tone of the whole thing was completely the opposite of that which I’d been thrilled about in July. The lady had filled me with so much hope and anticipation, which I hadnt dared to have before considering my previous negative experiences with guide dog assessments. Of course, in hindsight now I can absolutely understand why they made the decisions they did and I respect that; but I was so joyfully hopeful this time. Friends and family had been wholeheartedly encouraging me that this time, at last, I’d get the answer Ive been dreaming of for so long. Due to their unwavering certainty and the positive vibes I’d received after the assessment last time, I was quietly confident too, secretly hoping I’d get exactly what I was wishing for this time. But it didn’t work out that way. When the assessment started, we did a lot of talking; it was the instructor from the last assessment, a new GDMI I’d never met before and myself. Right from the beginning I was nervous; of course, even before they arrived I was nervous but as soon as they were in my lounge, an uncertainty I hadn’t had was with me. Once all the talking was done, during which I’d pretty much told them the full story of my experiences with Seeing Dogs, we went out for a route walk. As soon as the instructor asked, I knew things weren’t going as I’d dreamed; she wanted me to show them the route to the gym, which is my longest route and the one I learnt with John and Zena during our training and which became mine and Zena’s most used route. Slightly panicking, I grabbed my Trekker Breeze, praying they wouldn’t ask me to do it without it, and programmed in the route I needed. Thinking about it now, I might have been able to do the route without the Trekker – I did it so many times with zena – but I didn’t really want to take the risk. Plus, the difference doing the route with Zena and doing it with a cane is staggering.

The route went relatively well on the way there. They didn’t interupt or ask anything additional of me so I was able to concentrate on where I was going, with the additional landmark reminders from the Trekker as backup. They were reassuring and I was so glad I’d taken the risk of grabbing the Trekker. When we reached the gym, we immediately turned back around and headed home. On the return journey, I did do a short handle walk; it was terrifying. It’s so different from actually having a dog on the end of the harness and commanding a GDMI who is currently assessing whether you’re good enough for a dog you know 100% you want and need.

When we got home, they told me the verdict. Of course I wasn’t ready for a guide dog yet. Of course I dint have enough routes. My workload was nowhere near enough for a young lively new guide dog. I didn’t go out anywhere near as much as I needed to myself to enough different places to be ready for a dog. Secretly, I’d been expecting these comments. Although everyone else had been overly positive, a little secret part of my brain had been dreading they’d say all this. What came next was what I hadn’t expected. They had received comment back from Seeing Dogs, from John in fact, discussing my partnership with Zena. John had basically said that he thought I’d given up too soon, that my handling hadn’t been right and that due to my lack of routes Zena had gotten bored and therefore the partnership had crumbled. But according to him, if I’d tried harder or persevered longer, it would have all worked out. What I was experiencing was merely teething issues which every new partnership experiences for the first year after qualification. In a nutshell, it was my fault and I shouldn’t have quit. When I defended myself, trying to explain the severity of the issues I’d faced and the lack of support from the charity I felt I’d experienced, the GDMI said that I could experience any or all of these problems with one of their dogs, that usually many new owners do face these problems at the beginning of the partnership. I tried to counter that I didn’t feel the frequency of the occurrence of the problems were as bad with all new partnerships to what I had with Zena. Ours was pretty much a daily struggle with no high points.

They explained that due to my lack of routes and the comments from John, they had concerns about putting me forward for a Guide Dog. They explained again that I could experience any of the issues or even all of them with a new dog and because I’d given zena back, how would they know that I’d persevere with a new dog? Of course they didn’t actually say it like that but that was the message. Also, I needed to consider whether a dog was for me. They said that they felt I’d been given many opportunities to improve my amount of routes and hadn’t taken them. They said that of course they could appreciate there were two sides to every story where mine and Zena’s partnership was concerned but they couldn’t pretend that John’s report hadn’t given them worries.

So they left me with two options to think over. They said that if I felt after all this that actually a guide dog wasn’t for me right now I could close my application and reapply at a time when I did feel a dog would suit my lifestyle. Or, if I wanted, the instructor would put me forward for a My Guide application again and I could spend time working on my routes to create a large enough workload for a guide dog. The instructor said that if I chose My Guide then she’d contact the leader of Southampton’s My Guide service immediately so that I could be put forward for a new application. As before, she complimented my much improved long cane skills, saying how much more confidence I seemed to have whilst using it than she had seen the previous year. The GDMI added that I’d done a really good job correcting my own orientation errors along the route and that she felt it was a really good route. We did a lot of talking about how many routes I have. I explained how since the instructor had assessed me the previous year, I’d learnt a lot of new routes: the gym route (30 minutes there, 30 minutes back), the library route (a really recent learn, 20 minutes there and the same return), the routes on the bus both into Woolston our local small shopping street and into our main city centre, the route from Woolston on foot to my doctor’s surgery and pharmacy, and the locations of several shops both in Woolston and the city centre. Over the last year, I’ve personally felt I’ve made massive leaps and bounds in my mobility independence. I had a guide dog and despite the fact that she wasn’t a Guide Dogs dog and wasn’t the best working dog, she meant that I did my level best to leave the house daily more than just to put the rubbish out. This, for me, is huge! The addition of all the new routes is even more amazing progress. In 2016, it took me several months to learn the route to the local shop which is 5 minutes away from my house. But since then I’ve learnt routes that are lengthy, or lengthy in my book. Nowadays, I regularly meet up with my friend Josh, catching the bus into the city centre and going for lunch with him. That’s usually once weekly. And then most Tuesdays I take the bus into Woolston to have coffee and do a little shopping with my grandparents. Before Zena gave me that confidence, I’d never have dared.

This was all explained to the instructor and GDMI and although they seemed pleased that I’d made that progress, it was clear it still wasn’t enough. When discussing the My Guide option, we sketched out what I could accomplish with a volunteer’s help. We wrote out a list of routes I had in mind to try out and the lengths of each of them. Once we’d established this, the instructor and GDMI agreed that all of these combined would most definitely create a large enough workload for a guide dog but it was up to me whether I felt it was worthwhile putting that effort in, whether I thought creating that kind of work for myself was necessary right now and whether a guide dog would benefit my life. As they left, the instructor said to mull things over for a little while and let her know when I’d made my final decision.

To say I was crushed was an understatement. After all the hard work I’d put in learning new routes and still trying my best even after giving Zena back, I’d hoped I’d get a better answer than that. Right there and then, I couldn’t really think or feel anything, except shock that it hadn’t gone better and at what John had told them. As promised, as soon as the women had left, I ran upstairs and rang my sister Imi. In all of this guide dog mess, I have always had three solid figures in my life who I could rely on for sound advice and honesty. Of course my parents and wider family have been supportive too but the three main people, without whom I wouldn’t have pulled through all this, are Imi, my wonderful fella Kieran and my ex cricket captain and all round blindy hero Tiny. Of course, being Guide Dog owners themselves, Imi and Tiny have a whole host of knowledge and experience about Guide Dogs to fall back on when helping me out. As for Kieran, well, he’s my rock and always there for me no matter what, even when I’m wrong. The support of these three people in my life is utterly priceless to me and I can’t reiterate often enough how I wouldn’t have gotten through the worst times along this journey so far without them. Hence why Imi was my first port of call. To be fair, all she got when she answered the phone was a sudden gabbled statement of “I haven’t got enough routes and I’m not ready” before I burst into uncontrollable sobs. I say this not to be dramatic but because it was true. Poor Godwin probably thought things were a lot worse than they were because I don’t think shes ever heard me cry like that. Haltingly, I managed to tell her the full account of the morning’s events. The parts we focused on were the open option for My Guide and what John had told Guide Dogs in his report about me. Imi couldn’t believe how horrid he’d been; she saw mine and Zena’s partnership with her own eyes when we visited her in April so knows first hand how bad things. We’re. In fact, it was she who alerted me to some of the issues I hadn’t realised we were having. Eventually, we summarised that I needed to think what I wanted but that the My Guide offer was a fair one and definitely one I should take if I wanted to pursue getting a dog. However, I was so messed up about the whole thing that right there and then I wasn’t sure what I wanted. After everything John had told them, my worst fears seemed to be coming true. Maybe I’d been a bad owner. Maybe I shouldn’t have a guide dog. Maybe I didn’t need a guide dog and was again making up reasons why I should have one. The only solid argument I had for this theory was that however bad mine and Zena’s partnership had been, it improved my life dramatically. I was leaving the house with confidence and feeling good about my mobility. Yes, we had mountains of issues and these in the end made me decide that the partnership couldn’t work, but if nothing else, Zena proved how much guide dog mobility can enhance my life. That, above all my other insecurities and worries and uncertainties, makes me positive sure a guide dog is for me. At the end of mine and Imi’s call, I wasn’t feeling much better. But I was trying to take her level-headed logic and calmness on board.

Later, I spoke to Tiny on the phone. He was equally surprised about the outcome of the assessment. Above everyone else, he’d seemed the most certain for me that I’d get the answer I wanted. But as always he is my voice of reason. He knew what I needed to do before I really did. He knew I needed to reapply for My Guide, get all the routes I had in mind under my belt and then go back to the instructor and show what I’d accomplished. With all the routes I had in mind, I’d surely have a big enough workload then. He said that what John had said was unfair. He told me to give everything a lot of thought, at least sleep on it, before I decided what I was going to do. But we both knew what I was going to do. Tiny is always right.

As for Kieran, well, he was my comfort blanket, he said all the things I wanted and needed to hear. Over the following few days, gifts of my favourite sweets arrived in the post: 3 large boxes of Cadbury’s milk tray, a big bag of jelly tots and a box full of packets of love hearts. Although unnecessary, these gifts fulfilled their purpose; they cheered me up. Kieran hasn’t always fully understood my motives for being so persistent about wanting a guide dog. But he understands now;he knows for me a guide dog is my preferred mobility aid and that to me guide dog mobility feels almost natural, an extension of my arm the way his cane feels to him. And so his support is unwavering.

After giving it some thought and taking everyone’s comments on board, I’d made my decision. Like I’d thought that day on the phone with Tiny, I knew I was going for the My Guide option. Guide dog mobility improved my life that much that I felt giving up now wasn’t an option, especially when there was an open door of help to enable me to be ready for a guide dog available. Why would I slam that door? It’s the only available avenue to getting a guide dog left to me. I took the cheater’s way out with Seeing Dogs and look where that left me? Missing a dog that I loved with all my heart but who just wasn’t cut out to be a guide and who I’ve had nothing but abuse about from the charity she came from. I don’t regret having Zena in my life and I never could but the backlash and consequences of that that I’m now facing somethimes make me wonder whether it was worth it. The only positive I really got out of it is proof that guide dog mobility is the right thing for me. The pleasure of having Zena as my companion for 5 months was obviously a massive bonus and she taught me loads of vital dog ownership lessons, mainly to be patient when things aren’t going your way.

With Imi’s help, I sent an email to the instructor stating what I wanted to do. I told her I wanted to reapply for My Guide with the sole aim of learning all those routes we’d outlined in the meeting to then be reassessed for a guide dog. We also asked for clarification on just how many routes I needed to learn to have enough to form a decent workload for a dog. It was agreed that the ones I had in mind plus the additional ones I already knew would be enough. While I’d been thinking all this through and corresponding via email, my dad had already volunteered his services for helping to teach me routes. He already had one in mind: the route from home to a news agents. It takes a good 35-40 minutes to walk there from home but it builds on my existent route to the gym. Over the following few weeks, dad taught me this route as promised and I realised it was a very valuable route to have. Not only was it just an extension of an existing route I know solidly but it is also a convenient little shop to go to and it also passes a big park, perfect for free running. In fact, it’s the very park John and I used during training to free run Zena. I stopped using it because it became too much of a distraction for her whilst working on route to the gym. I felt this was a big accomplishment of mine and dad’s because really I’d learnt the routes to two new places. Although only additions to the existing route, still two new destinations and quickly learnt and memorised.

I was quickly contacted by the leader of My Guide, who did the application there and then over the phone. As soon as she’d completed the online form, she said she already had a volunteer in mind and could she come the following Wednesday so I could meet them and decide whether I thought she could help me. This took place in mid November. The lady’s name was Jenny and she’s helped others learn routes in the past. We discussed what I needed to do and then did a little walk outside. We just walked to the local Co-op and then came back. Jenny and I both said we were happy to work together and she seemed quite optimistic about achieving my route aims, the leader said she’d phone back in a couple of days and check with each of us that we were happy to go ahead and then fill out the appropriate paperwork so we could get started. A week later, she contacted us both by email to say we were a successful match and could start work together. That very evening, Jenny phoned me to arrange our first session. We agreed on the 7th of December at 10am with the plan to start my first new route, the longest of them all: the big walk into Woolston.

So eventually, the result was positive. I was matched with a volunteer swiftly and a plan put in place for me to learn new routes that would build up into a big enough workload for a guide dog. My aim currently is to take 6 months to learn all the routes I need. I’m not the quickest at picking up routes but am hoping 6 months will be long enough for me to be competent and confident with all the routes outlined in mine and Jenny’s action plan. That is the aim. Then, I’d like to be reassessed by Guide Dogs shortly afterward and then put forward for the waiting list. I hope by persevering with this and learning all these new routes that I can prove to Guide Dogs and anyone else that I’m committed to being a guide dog owner and committed to making any future partnerships I’m lucky enough to have the best they possibly can be. If all this hard work doesn’t show that I’m totally serious about owning and working a Guide dog then I don’t know what will.

“Taser him!”: my 3 weeks up North

Sadly, my Open University 5-month holiday has come to an end. But I was really lucky to be able to spend the last three weeks of it up north with Kieran and his family. Since I found out last year that I’d been matched with a dog from Seeing Dogs, I knew that I probably wouldn’t be visiting them up north for a while. I knew training would take near to a month and then I’d be settling into a new partnership. A lot of Guide Dog owners had warned me that the first six months of the partnership would be crucial bonding time and time spent getting used to being a team, so flying might not be the best idea. Of course, things with Seeing Dogs panned out a lot differently to how I expected them to and so I haven’t been to see Kieran since January. I’m very lucky that Kieran is lovely and whilst I trained with and got used to having Zena, he travelled down to see me. The eventual aim was always to take her up north so that I could visit Kieran and introduce her to new surroundings. But we never got that far and since she left in June, I’ve been busy trying to sort out all other aspects of my life. But at long last a visit to Blyth arrived and again, I had a very lovely time.

This visit was a bit different than the last three in that all other members of the household except me were employed and going out to work during the week. That meant that Lesley had to trust me to stay in her house and not wreck the place. This also meant that I needed to find something to entertain myself with during their working hours. Luckily and coincidentally, both my new open uni module websites opened on the fourteenth of September, two days after I flew up to stay. Having the websites open when they did meant I managed to get a really good head start on my modules. The courses didn’t actually start until 7 October but all work material was available to start studying from since the fourteenth of September. Although of course I went up north to spend that time with Kieran, having nothing else to do during the days really was beneficial for my studies. It means that now, in the first and actually introductory week to the modules, I’m five weeks ahead and starting an assignment for one and preparing to start note taking for the other. I couldn’t have hoped for a better start to the academic year.

On Tuesday 12 September, after double-checking that I’d packed everything I’d need for a three-week holiday into my huge rucksack, I grabbed my Trekker Breeze and headed for the bus-stop. Dad was still working in Wolston and so I needed to meet him at the end of his work day so that we could quickly pick Mum up from work and then head for the airport. At the airport, Mum took me inside and to the check-in desk and then across to the special assistance desk, where I was told that there were already people waiting for me in the departure lounge. For this flight, I was going to be joined by Kieran’s grandparents who had spent a little while down south visiting Kieran’s aunt and family. I was through security very quickly and soon with Kieran’s grandparents. Not long after I arrived, assistance came to help us all on to the plane. It wasn’t one of the nicer flights I’ve had; it was very turbulent and in the months that I hadn’t flown, I’d forgotten just how loud the plane was. Thankfully, my earphones and music volume turned up to maximum drown out most of the plane’s droning.

When we landed, we were helped off of the plane and on to the mini bus that drove us to the entrance into the airport. Assistance left me with Kieran’s grandparents and we made our way to Lesley and Kieran who were waiting in arrivals. On our way, we dropped Kieran’s grandparents off at their house. Once indoors, it was dinner time and Lesley had made a really lovely cottage pie. We spent the evening watching episodes of The Chase and The Force Northeast.

Wednesday was a good day. Kieran had booked the day off so that we could spend my first day together. Naturally, we indulged in a late lie in. Once we were up, showered and dressed, we went downstairs and agreed on fish fingers and potato waffles for lunch, which Kieran cooked. He also gave me a Sports Direct mug of tea to go with the food, which was really nice. It was a lazy day spent in the lounge watching Judge Judy. That evening, we had fish cakes, chips and peas for dinner and watched The Chase, Can’t Pay We’ll Take It Away and Paddington 24/7. Lesley baked her always lovely banana cake and we all had a slice while we watched telly.

Thursday was my first day home alone while everyone else went to work. It did feel strange dragging myself out of bed at just after 7am so that Kieran could get ready for work. Of course, I could have quite easily stayed in bed while he went to work for however long I felt like but I didn’t feel like being lazy and thought getting a head start on uni work would be more than a good idea. Before they left for work, Lesley gave me a detailed tour of the kitchen, even offering to leave a travel kettle out so that I could make tea more easily. Also, I was informed that there was a mug of carrot and coriander soup in the fridge. It was one of those plastic microwaveable mugs and definitely made heating up and drinking the very tasty soup easier. Later, Kieran arrived home earlier than usual and we watched some Nightmare Neighbour Next Door upstairs before coming down and having ravioli for dinner. Since being reintroduced to ravioli by Lesley one of the previous times I stayed, I’ve being hunting around at home trying to find similar stuff that I can have regularly. We’ve bought various different packs of ravioli but they haven’t compared to the stuff Lesley cooks. So having it on Thursday night was definitely a treat, especially with the added chunks of chorizo mixed in and the side of garlic bread accompanying it. We watched some more of The Chase and then Master Chef.

Friday was a new experience for me. It was Lesley’s day off. While she did lots of housework, I did uni work. In the morning, her parents arrived for their weekly cuppa and chat. Later, I was treated to an afternoon snack of more banana cake and a cup of tea. Just after 4pm, I went with Lesley to pick Kieran up from work. On the way, we chatted about Kieran’s childhood and I learnt quite a lot about the little person he once was.

That evening, Kieran and I had our first date night in a long time. Kieran had decided that he wanted it to be a totally independent date night so we were going to travel by taxi. Despite Lesley and John’s many offers to drive us, we stuck to Kieran’s decision of taking a taxi and had a nice driver who even helped us into the restaurant. We’d agreed on Beefeater after the amazing meals we’d enjoyed at Hereford’s branch. Kieran had booked a table earlier in the day and the service was phenomenal. We were taken to a table that seemed to have been specially selected for us because Kieran had added a note explaining that we were both blind. We were both given a copy of the Braille menu to browse. As it was date night, we decided to go all out on the food. For starters, Kieran had a prawn pan and I had potato dippers with cheese and bacon topping. Then, for main meals, Kieran had a stack burger with chips and I had a chicken melt with fries and a side of garlic bread strips which we shared. Finally, for pudding, Kieran had a strawberry frozen yoghurt with real strawberries and I had warm chocolate brownie with ice cream. Kieran’s only disappointment with the pudding was that it didn’t come with any fresh mint. When we were finally finished and the food had been paid for, Kieran ordered a taxi to take us home. Our waiter guided us to stand outside the restaurant so that we could be easily spotted by the taxi driver. When we’d been waiting quite a while, the waiter reappeared and asked whether we’d like to wait indoors and they’d keep an eye out for the taxi for us. Thinking it wouldn’t be long, we said we’d continue to wait outside. A car pulled up but nobody made a move to speak to us. We assumed that, as no one had called to us or come to get us, it couldn’t be our taxi. But the waiter came back outside and said there was a taxi there. So we moved towards it and got in. Almost from the moment we got into the car, the journey was wrong. The driver checked where we were going and asked Kieran several times for directions despite the obvious fact that he would be unable to give them. The car had a strong smell of smoke and also of drugs. As we reached Kieran’s area, the driver asked again for directions so Kieran used Google Maps to try and help locate his house. Kieran’s directions didn’t seem to be matching up with the way the driver was going. But he told us we were outside the right house so we got out of the car. It was quickly apparent that we weren’t in the right place. We wandered along the pavement with Kieran trying to find a familiar landmark with his cane to orientate us. As I could hear the car crawling along beside us, I shouted over to the driver to ask for directions to the front door. He just said we were there and after watching us for a little longer, drove off. Eventually, as Kieran couldn’t find anything at all familiar, he rang Lesley, who, after checking out of the front door, confirmed we weren’t on the street in front of the house. Eventually, through looking Kieran up on Find My Friends, Lesley realised that we were at the back of the houses and, in slippers, came to rescue us. It was a pretty traumatic way to end a really lovely evening and also a bit of a dampener on Kieran’s enthusiasm to use taxis and be independent of his parents. When we tried it in Hereford, it was so successful and being independent of parents always makes the date nights that little bit more special. So having it spoilt by that taxi driver was definitely a down point. To say all our parents were fuming was an understatement; Lesley promised that she’d be sending in a complaint first thing on Monday morning. To cheer up our evening, we went upstairs and chose Russell Howard’s Wonderbox DVD to watch.

The weekend was nice and relaxed. On Saturday morning, we had sausage sandwiches (in buns) for lunch before spending the afternoon watching football. John had gone to the Newcastle game so Kieran was keeping a close eye on that. Meanwhile, I was listening to the Liverpool match, which ended in a draw. Kieran was happy, though, because Newcastle beat Stoke 2—1. For dinner, we had a really tasty Greek lamb dish with new potatoes and cheesy broccoli. We spent the evening watching Gogglebox and then 8 out of 10 cats does count down, which John fell asleep through. He woke up for the beginning of Match Of The Day but was asleep soon after. Kieran tried to wake him up when the Newcastle game came on but it didn’t make much difference.

On Sunday, we took a trip out for dinner. We went to The Commissioners for a roast. I had pork with roast and new potatoes, Yorkshire puddings, carrots and lots of gravy. It was lovely. We spent the afternoon in the lounge and I read a book on Ibooks. Later, we went upstairs and agreed on watching Educating Yorkshire, which was shown four years ago. I remember watching some of it at college with Imi but the details were vague. As Educating Greater Manchester is currently on TV, we thought it would be good to catch up on previous series. Educating Yorkshire was very funny. We were also treated to one of my favourite things about staying at Kieran’s: Sunday night toasties! It was cheese and ham and it was delicious.

Monday was another uni day for me. Lesley left me cheese and ham sandwiches for lunch and Rebecca was home so I had a bit of company. We had beef gravy sandwiches with chips in gravy for dinner. It was very tasty. Afterwards, Kieran and I went upstairs to continuing watching Educating.

Tuesday was a bit of a mixture day. In the morning, Kieran worked from home so again I had some company. We sat together, him working and me studying, in the dining room. We had Gregg’s chicken bakes for lunch and Kieran’s grandma came to drive him to his maths class. While Kieran was at Maths, I spent the afternoon doing more uni work. When Kieran came home, he fixed some of the problems I’d been having with my laptop. Later, for dinner we had one of my favourite meals that Lesley cooks: her amazing jacket potatoes with Spanish chicken and peas. It’s the jacket potato that’s my favourite but the Spanish chicken and peas were good too. Afterwards, Kieran and I retreated upstairs to watch more Educating.

Wednesday and Thursday were a mixture of uni work, food and telly. On Wednesday, I worked on K217. In the evening, I had a shower and washed my hair while Kieran watched some Family Guy. Then, we went downstairs and had spaghetti bolognese with garlic bread for dinner and watched The Chase and Master Chef. Then, Kieran and I went upstairs to watch the final episode of Educating Yorkshire.

On Thursday, I worked on K240. In the evening, we all went out to Sambuca’s. I’d been hoping for this because they do my favourite tuna pizza. I can’t find anything similar down south and had missed it over the months I hadn’t visited. So of course I had the tuna and garlic pizza. I didn’t fancy a starter but Kieran had fish cakes. For his main, he had a meat feast pizza with chilies. When we got in, we watched Educating Greater Manchester and then Celebrity Juice.

Friday bought another day off for Lesley and again the weekly visit from her parents. I did more K217 work in the morning. For lunch, I had a slice of cheese and onion quiche, not homemade but still lovely, and then a pot of diced melon. I haven’t had melon for ages and it was really lovely. Later, Lesley and John left for a weekend at the caravan which meant Kieran and I had to fend for ourselves. Of course, this meant we were going to treat ourselves to takeaway. We agreed on pizza; I had a donner meat pizza, because it was necessary that I try one seeing as I’d never experienced it before, and Kieran had a meat feast pizza with meatballs on. We accompanied this with sides of potato wedges, cheesy chips and mozzarella sticks. The food was delicious but as always Kieran and I ordered far too much. While we ate, we watched The Simpsons and then Travels With My Father, the new series on Netflix by Jack and Michael Whitehall.

On Saturday morning, we were reluctant to drag ourselves out of bed so we watched several episodes of Judge Judy. Once we were finally up, showered and dressed, we went downstairs and agreed on sausages and potato waffles for brunch, which Kieran cooked. We watched the Master Chef final and then Sky Sports news to keep up-to-date with the football scores. Later, we watched the Liverpool vs Leicester game. Although we’d agreed on Chinese takeaway for dinner, whilst browsing on Hungry House, I’d discovered that up north you can order dessert takeaway. I am a pudding person and couldn’t resist this. So, while we watched the football, we ordered dessert. I chose a sticky toffee cake, a cream egg brownie and a banana and peanut butter milkshake. Kieran, not as much a pudding person as me, chose a strawberry cupcake, a vanilla milkshake and a glass bottle of Irn Bru. Sadly, the lady from the dessert place, Buzz Bar, rang to explain that they don’t stock cream egg brownie all year round because it’s a seasonal thing. So I chose a Snickers brownie instead. It is safe to say our pudding was delicious. Even Kieran was impressed with his cupcake and milkshake.

Once the football finished, Liverpool winning 3—2, we ordered our dinner. I chose sweet and sour chicken balls and chips while Kieran had house special chow mein with chips and gravy. We added spring rolls and special fried rice. The food was delicious but we definitely ordered far too much. While we ate our meal, we watched Reginald D Hunter’s In The Midst Of Crackers DVD, which was very funny.

Sunday’s breakfast was a funny mixture of food: I had the remainder of my toffee cake and brownie, a strawberry yoghurt and a little pie and Kieran had a little pie and some of the leftover sausage from Saturday. Later, when Lesley and John were home, we watched the Newcastle vs Brighton game, which made the men grumpy because Newcastle lost 0—1. Afterwards, we watched The Big Bang Theory, The Force Northeast and Can’t Pay We’ll Take It Away. For dinner, I had another lovely jacket potato and some chicken dippers while Kieran had the leftover rice and chow mein from Saturday with some chicken dippers. Once we’d eaten, we went upstairs so Kieran could shave his face ready for work and watch a movie. We chose Hot Fuzz because neither of us had seen it. Sadly, I must have gotten just too comfy because I slept throughout most of the film!

The next week was a mixture of uni work, food and telly. Monday brought K217 work and quiche and cheese and onion crisps for lunch. Then Judge Judy, Family Guy and a sad episode of Motorway Cops where a horse was hit by a car and put to sleep upstairs when Kieran came home followed by beef and gravy sandwiches with chips and gravy for dinner. We watched Dave Gorman’s Modern Life Is Goodish, Live At The Apollo 2016 Christmas special hosted by Romesh Rangernathan and featuring Seann Walsh and then a very funny episode of Gogglebox. Tuesday was another work from home day for Kieran and Lesley. We had quiche and sandwiches for lunch before Lesley took Kieran to his maths class. When he came home, we watched Judge Judy upstairs before enjoying mince and dumplings for dinner and watching The Force Northeast and The Chase. On Wednesday, I decided to have a day off uni work and instead watched Our Girl in preparation for the new series that the BBC had just announced. When Kieran came home, we watched Judge Judy and then had chicken pie, crochet potatoes and veg for dinner. We spent the evening watching The Great British Bake Off, The Force Northeast and Police Intercepters. As I’d been lazy on Wednesday, I made sure that Thursday was a uni work day; I worked on K217. When Kieran came home, we had music channels on the telly and it was decided that we’d have fish and chips for dinner. I had a large battered sausage and chips and Kieran had fish, chips and curry sauce. It was very nice. We watched Parking Wars and Educating Greater Manchester while Kieran downloaded some films. Then, we went upstairs and started watching Come Fly With Me, which is always very funny.

Friday brought Lesley’s day off but also a day off for Kieran too. We had a nice lie in before showering and going downstairs. By the time we went downstairs, Kieran’s grandparents were there. We had fish finger sandwiches for lunch. In the afternoon, Lesley made a really tasty orange cake. Rebecca bought us Nando’s in but they’d messed up the order. I thought that Nando’s take out was nicer than the meals we’ve had in Southampton’s branch. While we ate, we watched 8 out of 10 cats does count down. Later, Lesley and John went out to the races. Kieran and I watched The Chase and The Simpsons. Later, we ordered again from Buzz Bar; Kieran had a yorky and dairymilk caramel milkshake and another bottle of Irn Bru. I chose a banoffee cheesecake and millionaire’s shortbread milkshake, a white chocolate buttons cheesecake and a white chocolate cookie. As we were watching Come Fly With Me, Lesley called to ask Kieran to order them food because they were on their way home. They wanted pizza and kebab and it came with a free cheesy garlic bread. So as well as drinking our milkshakes, we ate the free garlic bread. I put the cheesecake in the fridge to eat later and tried the cookie but it really wasn’t very nice. When Lesley and John came in, we watched Gogglebox and The Last Leg.

On Saturday, we took a long drive to a place called Haggerston Castle. We had a long wander around the caravan site and Lesley told us about how she used to go there for holidays during her childhood. We had lunch in Mash and Barrels, the on site restaurant. Kieran and I both had chicken, bacon and cheese melt baguettes with chips. Sadly, the chips weren’t very nice but the baguette was tasty. When we got in, we watched the Chelsea vs Manchester City match, which Man City won, Celebrity Juice, QI, a little bit of Casualty, Dad’s army and Only Fools And Horses before going upstairs and watching Al Murray’s One Man One Guvnor.

On Sunday, Lesley made a cooked breakfast, which was lovely. Later, we watched the Newcastle vs Liverpool match, which was the first time we’ve watched our teams play against each other since we’ve been together; it ended in a draw. Once that had finished, Lesley took us to Frankie and Benny’s for our last date night. It was my last night up north and definitely the best possible way we could have spent it. Again, as it was date night, we went all out on food. Kieran had hot wings for his starter followed by a double cheese and bacon burger with pulled pork, onion rings and chips. He had Sam Adams beer with his meal and a Godfather cocktail afterwards. I had BBQ cheese and bacon potato skins for a starter and meatball penne pasta for my main. I had a coke to go with my meal but had finished that quite quickly so ordered a salted caramel fudge brownie milkshake, which was very nice. After my main, while Kieran had his cocktail, I had a warm chocolate brownie with salted caramel sauce and ice cream. I definitely thought I could manage more than I did because I wasn’t able to drink all of the milkshake and left a little bit of brownie. It really was delicious and one of the nicest meals I’ve had for a while. When we got home, we agreed on Chris Ramsey’s All Growed Up comedy DVD because it is hilarious.

Sadly, Monday meant my last day up north. In the morning, when we finally got up, we showered, dressed and then I packed all my stuff into my rucksack. We had a slice of toast each for breakfast and then I ate one of my remaining yoghurts and dug into the white chocolate buttons cheesecake from our order from Buzz Bar on Friday. I shared it with Kieran and it really was lovely. We spent the afternoon having a cuddle upstairs and listening to music. Lesley made us ravioli for dinner. It had bits of pepperoni in the sauce and was lovely. Afterwards, Lesley gave us a slice of orange cake each. Then, we gathered my belongings together and headed out the door.

We arrived at the airport with plenty of time to spare. I was quickly checked in and Lesley rang through at the special assistance desk. We were told to wait for someone to come. It took them quite a while to come but eventually they did. That meant the goodbyes; I hate saying goodbye to Kieran because we’re never totally sure when we’ll be able to meet up again, especially now Kieran is working. After we’d said goodbye, the assistance man led me off to security. I was through security quickly and didn’t have to wait long in the waiting room before the man returned and led me to the mini bus. He came on to the bus with me and then led me on to the plane. I put my earphones in and turned my music up loud for the flight and thankfully it wasn’t too bad.

To Lesley and John: thank you for letting me come to stay and putting up with me for so long; can’t tell you how much I appreciate it. Thank you for the lovely meals, in and out. Thank you for such a nice time. PS: I did not pull down your sign…

And Kieran: as always, there’s far too much to say. Thank you, for everything, but mainly for being my person. I love you so much and can’t wait for when we can be together again. It was so lovely to see you enjoying your work so much; I’m so proud of you. You’ve done just what we said all those Tuesday afternoons at college spent imagining what life would be like out of the bubble. You’re not a statistic. For that, I love you more.